Advertisements
 

Resting Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability: January 2020 Update

How’s my progress on the road to achieving a resting heart rate (RHR) as close to 40 beats per minute (bpm) as possible? Shown below is my RHR data for August 2018-Jan 2019, which corresponds to the 6-month period after I started tracking RHR. When compared with that period, am I still making year-over-year progress?

jan hr

First, note that my Jan 2019 RHR value of 47.4 bpm seems dramatically reduced when compared with Aug-Dec 2018. My computer crashed in Jan 2019, and I lost 4 days of January 2019 RHR data, with remaining data for 27 days. Accordingly, I didn’t expect to be better than that, year-over-year. Nonetheless,  my average RHR for Jan 2020 is 46.9 bpm, which is superficially better, but it isn’t statistically different from Jan 2019 (p = 0.13). However, my RHR is still going in the right direction!

What about my heart rate variability (HRV)? Relative to Jan 2019 (56.6), my HRV in Jan 2020 was significantly higher (76; p=0.003), but note that I didn’t additionally improve my HRV relative to December 2019 (86.3).

hrvjan2

I’ve been consistent with my exercise program, including weekly workouts (3-4x, ~1 hr each session) and walking (15-20 miles), so are there other variables that may explain the sudden increase in HRV from Nov 2019-Jan 2020? During that time, I’ve been cutting my calorie intake by a small amount (~100-200 cals/day) below my body weight maintenance intake, with the goal of getting leaner. As a result, I’ve slowly decreased my body weight from 157 to 154 during that time. Although there is a weak negative correlation between my body weight with HRV (R2=0.0553), this association is statistically significant (p=0.024). So reducing body weight may have played a role in the sudden HRV increase:

hrv bw

For those who may have missed my other post updates for RHR and/or HRV:
Dec 2019 update: https://michaellustgarten.com/2020/01/01/resting-heart-rate-heart-rate-variability-december-2019-update/

Oct, Nov 2019 update: https://michaellustgarten.com/2019/12/05/resting-heart-rate-heart-rate-variability-still-making-progress/

Sept 2019 update: https://michaellustgarten.com/2019/10/08/resting-heart-rate-year-over-year-update/

Also, why a RHR as close to 40 bpm may be optimal: https://michaellustgarten.com/2019/02/02/resting-heart-rate-whats-optimal/

 

If you’re interested, please have a look at my book!

 

Advertisements

Michael Lustgarten

Ph.D, Physiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2009 B.S., Biochemistry, Queens College, 2003 B.A, English Textual Studies, 1994, Syracuse University

2 thoughts on “Resting Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability: January 2020 Update

  1. RHR (Resting Heart Rate) is a important predictor of longevity, but VO2Max is claimed to be better. “CRF (VO2max) is the strongest independent predictor of future life expectancy in both healthy and cardiorespiratory-diseased individuals. ” Also ways to boost VO2Max in 4 or 12 weeks follow “Results of the Resistance and Endurance exercise After ChemoTherapy (REACT) study found that both a high-intensity and a low- to moderate-intensity resistance and endurance exercise program over 12 weeks are effective in reducing general and physical fatigue, but favoring high-intensity training when it comes to improving VO2max (mean VO2max improvements of 4.4. ml/kg/min after high-intensity versus 3.3. ml/kg/min after low- to moderate-intensity training) (68). Even shorter term high-intensity endurance training over 4 weeks appears to offer superior and clinically meaningful improvements in VO2max (+ 3.5. ml/kg/min) ” https://www.bioscience.org/2018/v23/af/4657/2.htm For RHR “However, only endurance training and yoga significantly decreased the RHR in both sexes…Their meta-analysis revealed a reduction in heart rate of 6.59 bpm in studies that compared yoga with no-treatment usual care. … endurance training causes RHR reductions of 8.4% in older individuals which were even higher in controlled clinical trials with a training length of more than 30 weeks” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306777/

    1. I care about consistent, long-term gains, Stuart. Can I decrease my RHR more quickly? Yes. CanI mantain that level of intensity to keep my RHR low? Probably not. Slow and steady for this, imo.

Leave a Reply to Michael Lustgarten Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Next Post

Biological Age = 32.75y, Chronological Age = 47y: First 2020 measurement

Fri Feb 14 , 2020
Measurement of biological age with Levine’s Phenotypic Age calculator is strongly correlated with chronological age (r=0.94; see https://michaellustgarten.com/2019/09/09/quantifying-biological-age/). In 2019, I measured all 9 of its analytes 3 times, with biological age readings of 35.39y, 35.58y, and 31.3y, for an average 2019 biological age of 34.09y (see https://michaellustgarten.com/2019/11/01/biological-age-31-3y-chronological-age-46y/). That’s 12 […]
%d bloggers like this: