Tag Archives: CML

AGE Products Impact Lifespan: Impact Of Hyperglycemia, Kidney Function, And The Microbiome

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Papers referenced in the video:

Oral glycotoxins determine the effects of calorie restriction on oxidant stress, age-related diseases, and lifespan https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18599606/

Reduced oxidant stress and extended lifespan in mice exposed to a low glycotoxin diet: association with increased AGER1 expression https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17525257/

Gut microbiota drives age-related oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in microglia via the metabolite N 6-carboxymethyllysine https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35241804/

Plasma Carboxymethyl-Lysine, an Advanced Glycation End Product, and All-Cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Older Community-Dwelling Adults https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19682127/

Advanced glycation end products and their circulating receptors predict cardiovascular disease mortality in older community dwelling women https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19448391/

Acute Hyperglycemia Causes Intracellular Formation of CML and Activation of ras, p42/44 MAPK, and Nuclear Factor KappaB in PBMCs https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12606501/

Experimental Hyperglycemia Alters Circulating Concentrations and Renal Clearance of Oxidative and Advanced Glycation End Products in Healthy Obese Humans https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30823632/

Novel associations between blood metabolites and kidney function among Bogalusa Heart Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis participants https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31720858/

Serum Carboxymethyl-lysine, a Dominant Advanced Glycation End Product, is Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19853477/

Dietary AGE Products Impact Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, And Lifespan

Cooking foods at temperatures higher than boiling produces advanced glycation end (AGE) products, which induce insulin resistance and inflammation, and shorten lifespan in mice. Similar data exists in humans for the effect of dietary AGE products on insulin resistance and inflammation, and a higher dietary AGE product intake is associated with cancer in both men and women. Accordingly, reducing dietary AGE product intake may be an important strategy for improving health and increasing lifespan in people.