Tag Archives: LPS

Microbial Products Affect the Hallmarks Of Aging: 1) Mitochondrial Function

The Hallmarks of Aging are well established, but what is less discussed is the impact of microbes and/or microbial products. The bacterial metabolite, LPS, increases during aging, and it negatively impacts mitochondrial function, thereby demonstrating a role for microbial products on one of the Hallmarks of Aging, mitochondrial dysfunction.

Paper Discussion: Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Lipopolysaccharide as Mediators Between Gut Dysbiosis and Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease

In the video below, Steve Hill from Lifespan.io and I talk about findings from a recent paper (https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad200306) that supports a role for the gut microbiome on Alxheimer’s disease. Check it out!

LPS Increases During Aging: Besides Calorie Restriction, What Else Can Reduce It?

LPS increases during aging, which may explain the age-related increase for CD38 and decreased NAD+. LPS is decreased on a calorie restricted diet, but what else can reduce it? In this video, I present evidence for intestinal alkaline phosphatase’s (IAP) role on LPS, and posit that interventions that increase IAP may be an important approach for increasing NAD+.

 

 

CD38 Gets In The Way Of NR And NMN For Increasing NAD+

NR and NMN are popular ways to try to boost levels of NAD+, but that approach hasn’t worked every time in human studies. One reason for that may involve CD38, which degrades both NR and NMN. With the goal of boosting NAD+ levels during aging, why does CD38 increase with age, and what can be done about it? All that and more in this video!

New publications!

Paper #1: Here I propose that the poor muscle composition (muscle that has fat in it) found in older adults may be related to an increased systemic microbial burden:

exp ger.png

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29030163

 

Paper #2: In this review, we discuss the emerging gut-muscle axis:

gg ml review.png

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29058056

 

If you’re interested, please have a look at my book: