Tag Archives: Alzheimer’s Disease

Paper Discussion: Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Lipopolysaccharide as Mediators Between Gut Dysbiosis and Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer’s Disease

In the video below, Steve Hill from Lifespan.io and I talk about findings from a recent paper (https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad200306) that supports a role for the gut microbiome on Alxheimer’s disease. Check it out!

Longevity Genes: APOE

A reduced mortality risk and an increased lifespan has been reported for people who have APOE2 alleles, when compared with APOE3 or APOE4, but beyond associations, data for lifespan in APOE-expressing mice was recently reported, evidence that supports a causative role for APOE on longevity.

Deep Sleep: How Does It Change During Aging, What’s Its Connection To Alzheimer’s Disease, And What’s My Data?

Sleep changes during aging may impact Alzheimer’s disease risk, and with the goal of minimizing that risk, can sleep, in particular, levels of deep sleep, be optimized?

Epigenetic Clocks: Which Has The Best Correlation For Aging and Age-Related Diseases?

11 epigenetic clocks have been published since 2011, but which is best for predicting aging and age-related disease? In this video, I present findings from a recent publication, “Underlying features of epigenetic aging clocks in vitro and in vivo”, that compared data for 11 epigenetic clocks, and derived a new epigenetic clock, the meta-clock.

Fungi In The Blood, Fungi In The Brain: Rapamycin To The Rescue?

The incidence of fungi bloodstream infections increases during aging-is that a potential explanation for the presence of fungi in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease patients? Rapamycin is a known antifungal-is it effective against fungi that are found in the blood and brain?

Tracking Deep Sleep-Can It Be Improved?

Deep sleep, the stage of sleep also known as “slow wave sleep” declines during aging. Based on a meta-analysis of 65 studies representing 3,577 subjects (aged 5 years to 102 years; Ohayon et al. 2004), slow wave sleep, expressed as a percentage of total sleep time decreases during aging from 25% in childhood to less than 10% in adults older than 65 years:Screen Shot 2019-02-16 at 5.14.10 PM.png Continue reading