Tag Archives: VLDL

How Much Oxalate Is Too Much? n=1 Analysis

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Papers referenced in the video:

Dietary oxalate to calcium ratio and incident cardiovascular events: a 10-year follow-up among an Asian population https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35346210/

Predicting Age by Mining Electronic Medical Records with Deep Learning Characterizes Differences between Chronological and Physiological Age https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5716867/

Association between low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and cardiovascular mortality in statin non-users: a prospective cohort study in 14.9 million Korean adults https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35218344/

Joint distribution of lipoprotein cholesterol classes. The Framingham study) AND abbott lipoproteins 1983 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6573877/

Incidental lymphopenia and mortality: a prospective cohort study https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31932337/

Blood counts in adult and elderly individuals: defining the norms over eight decades of life https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32030733/

Effect of Aging on Serum Uric Acid Levels: Longitudinal Changes in a Large Japanese Population Group https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12242321/

Liver enzymes and risk of all-cause mortality in general populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24585856/

Increased red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is associated with higher glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the elderly https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25651746/

VLDL Increases During Aging, And Is Associated With Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes

Papers referenced in the video:

Remnant Cholesterol and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk: https://www.jacc.org/doi/10.1016/j.ja…

The effect of adiponectin in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the potential role of polyphenols in the modulation of adiponectin signaling: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science…

Joint distribution of lipoprotein cholesterol classes. The Framingham study: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/6573877/

Long-term coronary heart disease risk associated with very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in Chinese: the results of a 15-Year Chinese Multi-Provincial Cohort Study (CMCS): https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20223…

Remnant Cholesterol, Not LDL Cholesterol, Is Associated With Incident Cardiovascular Disease: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33272…

Remnant cholesterol and coronary atherosclerotic plaque burden assessed by computed tomography coronary angiography: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30870…

Premature myocardial infarction is strongly associated with increased levels of remnant cholesterol: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26687…

Dietary Cholesterol Vs. Plasma Cholesterol: My n=1 Data

With use of a food scale,  I’ve been tracking my daily macro- and micronutrient intake every day since April 2015. In addition, I have 15 blood test measurements during that period, and accordingly, I’m able to examine correlations between my dietary intake with my circulating biomarkers. In this post, I’ll address the question, is my dietary cholesterol intake significantly correlated with plasma levels of cholesterol?

1. Plasma levels of total cholesterol vs. dietary cholesterol:

tc.png

In the plot we see a borderline significant (p = 0.06), moderate correlation (r = 0.5) between my plasma total cholesterol with my dietary cholesterol intake. However, note that total cholesterol is comprised of “good” and “bad” parts, with HDL as the “good”, and with non-HDL cholesterol, including LDL and VLDL, as the “bad”. What does that data look like?

2. Plasma levels of non-HDL (LDL+VLDL) cholesterol vs. dietary cholesterol:

nonhdl.png

In the plot we see a highly significant (p = 0.006), strong correlation (= 0.67) between my non-HDL cholesterol levels with my dietary cholesterol intake. It’s not possible to show causation via correlation, but this data suggests that my dietary cholesterol intake may be driving increased levels of non-HDL cholesterol.

3. Plasma levels of HDL cholesterol vs. dietary cholesterol:

hdl.png

In the plot, first note that in contrast with the positive correlations between total and non-HDL cholesterol with my dietary cholesterol intake, the correlation between HDL with my dietary cholesterol intake is negative (i.e., going in the opposite direction; r = 0.51), and borderline significant (p = 0.054).

Cumulatively, it looks like my dietary cholesterol intake may be related to increased “bad” cholesterol and decreased “good” cholesterol. As a limitation of this approach, although I’ve shown blood test data for 15 measurements (which is a decent sample size), I only have 4 measurements with an average daily cholesterol intake around 200 mg or greater. In the near future, I expect to average 200 mg of daily cholesterol (or more) per day, so let’s see if these correlations hold up!

 

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